Author Topic: What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?  (Read 19241 times)

Adroth

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« on: August 10, 2004, 12:34:30 AM »
What ever happened to the Mapua - PA RPV project?

Another case of ningas kugon?
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Anonymous

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Mapua and the RPVs
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2004, 09:18:25 PM »
Indigenous Tactical UAV takes flight
The Philippine Army displayed a locally developed unmanned aerial vehicle last Independence Day. The following information was obtained from a Newsbreak report.

TUAV Characteristics:
Weight: 30 lbs.
Length: 4 ft. 2 in.
Wingspan: 10 ft.
Operating Ceiling: 2,000 ft
Speed: 50-80 knots
Operating radius: 12.43 miles (20 km)
Cost (incl. research and development, prototypes, etc.): P 3.5 million
Endurance: 2 hours

Developed by Col. Ricardo Morales and Obi Mapua, a board member of the Mapua Institute of Technology. Typical missions would include area surveillance, route reconnaissance, environmental protection, disaster assessment, and communications enhancement. Controlled by 3 to 5 ground technicians. Flight tests have been ongoing since February 2001. If successful, the plan is to eventually issue the TUAV at brigade level.

http://www.inq7.net/nwsbrk/2001/jun/29/nbk_6-1.htm

CityHunter

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Mapua and the RPVs
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2004, 11:18:38 PM »
Nice!  Its really not that hard to make these RPVs its just the tech on the frequency leaper (forgot the correct term) to avoid jammings.  Ito na ata uso sa ngayon as pati RPV type subs are being developed.  Remember that old TV show where there's this hi-tech sub na may mga RPVs baka sa future ganun na ang norm.  

Medyo OT na ito but I gleaned from the grapevine that China is furthering tests on cloning.  As in human clones na.  Mas matindi yun if there's an ounce of truth to this as the human factor always has an edge over tech.  Parang laban na tuloy like doon sa Star Wars episode 1 (or 2 ba yun).
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Public

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Mapua and the RPVs
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2004, 03:07:44 AM »
clone soldiers? maybe more on cloned body parts for battlefield medicine

Adroth

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2004, 01:00:11 PM »
What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program? Are we still pursuing it, or are we buying models from Israel or Singapore?

Quote from: 7th Infantry Division Website
The first demonstration was the product of years of research, the Army Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (Army TUAV). The Army Aviation Battalion has five TUAVs. According to Col Ricardo Morales, the Assistant Chief of Staff for Plans, G5 of the Philippine Army, the small aircrafts are remote controlled and equipped with video camera especially designed to provide imagery intelligence and support area surveillance, route reconnaisance, environmental protection, disaster assessment and communication enhancement. Col Morales added that the Army TUAV will help soldiers corner the enemy and destroy their encampment during combat operations. The demonstration was held at the Aviation Battalion airstrip.


http://www.army.mil.ph/Army_Sites/INFANTRY%20DIVISIONS/7ID%20Website/1st%20quarter/html/senmag.html

The Philippine Air Force is trying to make up for being caught flat footed in the UAV department:

http://www.paf.mil.ph/af_review/vol01/UAV_PAF.HTM
The campaign to establish a Philippine equivalent to DARPA / DAPA / DSTA: http://adroth.ph/srdp_roadmap_darpa/

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Pvt.Parts

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2004, 02:38:02 PM »
they decide to hire mananaggals instead
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QUERITALAMA

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2004, 03:15:24 PM »
We're gettin' there....    :D

CityHunter

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2004, 09:37:13 PM »
It really isn't hard to make a simple UAV.  Couple a remote control system to a flying platform plus a wireless cam and that's it.  The real problem would be on how to prevent tangos from controlling or accessing the infos too.  My guess would be frequency hoppers.  The trend nga nowadays are remote piloted machines which could even be used as attack platforms.  I recall that there is even a tv guided anti-tank missile which you guide like in video games.
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Anonymous

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2004, 08:16:33 AM »
Quote
I recall that there is even a tv guided anti-tank missile which you guide like in video games.

....Nikita missiles???  :D  :D

Anonymous

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2004, 08:17:09 AM »
Quote
I recall that there is even a tv guided anti-tank missile which you guide like in video games.



.....nnikita missiles??   :D  :D

CityHunter

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2004, 08:44:46 AM »
I forgot the make and model but its linked by fiber optic wires.  You guide it using a small tv screen and joystick sa launcher.  Bit hard siguro to do as mabilis yun lipad.
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Adroth

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What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2005, 10:29:13 PM »
Blast from the past:

Quote
The Army's New Baby

http://www.inq7.net/nwsbrk/2001/jun/29/nbk_6-1.htm
 
IF you can't trust your men in the field, maybe a plane can do the spying for you.


The Army has designed and built its own unmanned plane that can fly 20 kilometers from a command center and record what it sees 2,000 feet below. What the plane can capture in its TV surveillance monitor could be seen in real time by soldier-technicians manning the controls on the ground.

Then they interpret the images and radio the information to brigade commanders who need it. Or, the commander can choose to be in the control post himself.

Called the Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (TUAV), the Army's new baby was conceptualized, designed, and built solely by Filipino soldiers, engineers, and technicians.

Made of wood, it weighs only 30 lbs, is 50-inch long with a wingspan of 120 inches, and has a speed of 50-80 knots. Its engine is similar to the engine of a grass-cutter.

In countries like Singapore, Thailand, and those in Europe, UAVs cost a lot-from a low of P30 million to a high of P100 billion, such as the US' sleek Predator, whose surveillance equipment can penetrate even small images on the ground. But this one is worth only P3.5 million, to include research, design, and materials used to built it.

Ten years ago, while browsing the Internet for the latest military hardware, Col. Ricardo Morales thought it was a good idea for the Army to have its own UAV. But an imported UAV would cost the Army P30 million. Morales researched further and in 1996 submitted a project proposal to the intelligence staff of the Armed Forces, which approved it a year later. "The Army should have one simply because we don't expect the Air Force to do this for us," says Morales. "Eventually, each brigade should have one UAV."

The Ombudsman has also sought to consolidate the illegal use of an alias and the perjury cases with the plunder case. The Sandiganbayan approved the consolidation of the alias case, but the perjury case will continue to be heard by the first division.

Money was finally released October last year, and architect Obi Mapua, who sits on the board of the Mapua Institute of Technology, and a group of military technicians went to work. Mapua is also known for his model plane designs.

The TUAV is so light because it carries only two principal items on board: the payload (camera and transmitter) and avionics, which is the equipment that fixes the plane's altitude and makes it fly. From launch control on the ground, the surveillance plane will have an estimated 50-meter take-off run before flying at a level of 2,000 feet. It has an endurance time of two hours and can monitor the battlefield or non-battle images on the ground: vegetation, large troop movements, big fires, flooding, etc. "It's like daylight TV," says Morales.

On the ground, the control is manned by three to five technicians and officers who can see the images as they are captured by the TUAV. The distance between the control post and the plane should only be 20 kilometers. The range will improve as the plane goes hi-tech in due time.

What can it do? The TUAV was built to provide imagery intelligence (Imint), apart from the human and signal intelligence that the military now has. It can support the following missions: area surveillance, route reconnaissance, environmental protection, disaster assessment, and communications enhancement.

Other hi-tech UAVs can fly straight for 24 hours, have monitors that can penetrate deep into the jungles, and are able to produce sharp images of small objects. The TUAV is still a long way from that; the Army is just starting with something it can call its own, sans defense contracts and dollar bills. Since the first test missions were conducted last February, in fact, two experimental TUAVs have already crashed.

That hasn't disheartened those behind the project. The Army displayed its new baby at the recent Independence Day parade. Next month, the plane will be finally tested at the Army's prime training grounds at Fort Magsaysay in Nueva Ecija.

If it passes the test with flying colors, the plane will have it first real mission outside Metro Manila. But due to limited technology, it won't be able to spot Abu Sabaya's cool aviator shades in the jungles of Basilan. Not for now, at least.

- Glenda M. Gloria
The campaign to establish a Philippine equivalent to DARPA / DAPA / DSTA: http://adroth.ph/srdp_roadmap_darpa/

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SIG_P210

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What happened to the PA UAV program?
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2007, 08:05:51 PM »
Moderator's note: Split off from the UAV PREDATOR A PHILIPPINE AIR FORCES thread.

=== ~~~ ===

The PA experimented with UAVs with the help of the Mapua Institute of technology. Too bad the pics are gone

http://afp-cmo.tripod.com/articles-2002/02-12-spy-plane.html
Quote

'Meron na pala, a.'

That was FIVE (5) years ago, I wonder what happened to the whole program.  Any progress? 

Ideally, after 5 years of development, we should have a working, OPERATIONAL system already.  I'd like to fantasize there's an indigenous UAV program out there somewhere that the AFP is keeping under cloak & dagger, but the sad part is, maybe the program for some reason just hasn't progressed much, or was shelved.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2007, 08:18:20 PM by Adroth »
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Adroth

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« Last Edit: June 19, 2007, 07:48:53 AM by Adroth »
The campaign to establish a Philippine equivalent to DARPA / DAPA / DSTA: http://adroth.ph/srdp_roadmap_darpa/

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Adroth

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Re: What is the status of the Philippine Army UAV program?
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2008, 01:02:43 PM »
Now we know what happened to this project.

Unfortunately, it is difficult to build UAVs from COTS components. Most of the problems encountered in such projects are failures in actuator and "avionics" (note the quotation marks) subsystems. Downlink/uplink problems (reliability of comm links) are usually encountered with the use of such components. Range is also very questionable.

The greatest technological hurdle faced by those intending to build UAVs is in mounting stabilized optics. Using "RC-class" aircraft as base platforms limits the optics that you can mount due to the inherently small size of such aircraft.

No disrespect to the PNP, but I think their UAV project still needs a lot of work. I reckon it more as a public relations initiative than anything else. Lest I be misconstrued as a PNP basher, I do think that their bomb disposal robot has greater potential and should be given more efforts.

Oh BTW, The AFP has actually built a UAV in cooperation with Mapua, yet it encountered the problems I stated above.
The campaign to establish a Philippine equivalent to DARPA / DAPA / DSTA: http://adroth.ph/srdp_roadmap_darpa/

Don't get mad at China. GET EVEN. Join the movement to defy a Chinese "order".