Author Topic: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)  (Read 42167 times)

Adroth

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29592
  • Logo from: www.proudlypinoy.org
    • http://www.adroth.ph
BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« on: November 18, 2006, 12:29:59 AM »






=== ~~~ ===

The Jacinto Class Patrol Vessel is a long time favorite-topic amongst Timawans -- even back in the days of the olive-drab forum.

Here are some of the discussions to date.

BRP RICARTE AND MABINI
Posted by Recondo on November 17, 2006

Jacinto class 76mm gun
Posted by Pachada on June 16, 2006

LOCSIG or REMSIG: JCPV 25mm gun
Posted by Pepe on June 4, 2006

20mm gun on Jacinto class and other PN ships
Posted by Pachada on May 26, 2006

PS36 Post upgrade pic
Posted by Manokski on May 25, 2006

Kapabilidad ng mga bagong armamento ng Jacinto OPV
Posted by Pachada on February 12, 2006

Jacinto class
Posted by Manokski on December 9, 2005

25mm automatic gun system on the Jacinto class ships
Posted by Manokski on November 18, 2005

Why Radamec 1500 and Not 2500 for Fire Control
Posted by Thinking Filipino on December 13, 2004

ORBAT UPDATES - PS35 DRYDOCK PICS
Posted by Manokski on December 9, 2004

Is the Jacinto Class Main Gun Still Effective?
Posted by Thinking Filipino on December 8, 2004

Qinetic upgrade of Jacinto-class: UPDATE
Posted by Anon on December 5, 2004
« Last Edit: February 09, 2009, 10:23:37 AM by Adroth »
Don't get mad at China. GET EVEN. Join the movement to defy a Chinese "order".


firstknight

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1063
Re: Jacinto Class Patrol Vessel threads
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2009, 12:54:02 AM »
saw this pix from http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=455536&page=2...
posted by skyblade... i think she deserves to be located her.

 :beer:


backdoor69

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 134
Re: Jacinto Class Patrol Vessel threads
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2009, 03:10:33 AM »
T'was many years ago this:


Happy SEAMEN
"Ne Conjugare Nobiscum"

Adroth

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29592
  • Logo from: www.proudlypinoy.org
    • http://www.adroth.ph
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2009, 10:33:18 AM »
Four year old news.

End of Successful Philippines Phase Brings CARAT Series to Close
Navy NewsStand

Story Number: NNS050823-05
Release Date: 8/23/2005 11:50:00 AM

By Chief Journalist Melinda Larson, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 1 Public Affairs
In-Depth Coverage

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/news/2005/08/mil-050823-nns02.htm

PUERTA PRINCESA CITY, Philippines (NNS) -- The annual Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercise series ended Aug. 23 with the closing of the Philippines phase.

Capt. Buzz Little, commander of Destroyer Squadron 1 and the CARAT task group, members of his staff, and officers from three CARAT task group ships went ashore here today to close out the exercise at the Philippine Navy’s Headquarters Naval Forces West.

“The CARAT Philippine phase was successful because both of our military forces cooperated on many levels at sea and ashore,” Little said during his closing ceremony remarks.

CARAT is an annual series of bilateral military training exercises designed to enhance cooperative working partnerships with several Southeast Asian nations. Ensuring freedom of the seas by increasing maritime security efforts in the region is a primary focus of the CARAT series.

The Philippines phase of the 11th annual exercise series was marked with many milestones, including the first-time operational employment of the U.S. Navy’s Combined Enterprise Regional Information Exchange System (CENTRIXS), a real-time communications capability that gave commanders a comprehensive tactical picture.

“It takes a little adjusting for a Filipino to understand the words spoken by an American and vice versa,” noted Philippine Vice Adm. Ruben Domingo, commander, Western Command during his closing remarks. “The exercise gave everyone the opportunity to get accustomed to each other’s way of communicating verbally or through the use of codes and signals using modern communication equipment.”

CENTRIXS was installed at the Philippine Navy’s (PN) CARAT headquarters ashore in Manila, enabling exercise “Orange” and “Blue” force commanders to have a communications capability that was not available before.

“This ability to communicate among each other, combined with our ability to plan and execute complex maritime security and warfare scenarios at sea, highlight our CARAT achievements and, most importantly, burnish our mutual respect and ability to depend upon our navies in the years to come,” Little said.

Building strong alliances is key when combating transnational criminals who increasingly use vital sea lanes in the area to commit acts of piracy or to transport illegal caches of weapons and drugs. The threat of maritime terrorism has become a transnational issue, Domingo said.

“Terrorists do not recognize national boundaries, and they do not discriminate on their targets,” Domingo said. “We have come to realize that collective effort is needed to effectively fight terrorism. This brings us back to one good reason why the conduct of the CARAT exercise should be done seriously, so that we can enhance our interoperability to fight terrorists wherever they are.”

Strengthening skill sets together is vital to combined forces, especially in the maritime interdiction arena. By learning each other’s visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) tactics, the teams were able to build confidence during pierside symposia held before taking the boardings to sea.

“We really worked on our interoperability, which can only strengthen maritime security in the region,” said Lt. Justin Long, USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60) operations officer.

Rodney M. Davis’ boarding team worked in tandem with the PN patrol ship Rizal (PS 74), while USS Paul Hamilton’s (DDG 60) boarding team paired up with the patrol ship Emelio Jacinto (PS 35).

< Edited >
Don't get mad at China. GET EVEN. Join the movement to defy a Chinese "order".


jcabanit

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3033
BRP Emilio jacinto(PS-35)
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2009, 09:07:54 AM »
BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Career (United Kingdom) 
Name: HMS Peacock (P239)
Builder: Hall Russell
Laid down: 1982
Launched: 1 December 1982
Commissioned: 1983
Decommissioned: 1 August 1997
Fate: Transferred to Philippine Navy in 1997.
Badge: 
Career (Philippines) 
Name: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
Namesake: Emilio Jacinto (1875-1899), was a Filipino revolutionary known as the Brains of the Katipunan.
Operator: Philippine Navy
Acquired: 1 August 1997
Commissioned: 4 August 1997
Fate: In service with the Philippine Navy
General characteristics
Class and type: Jacinto class(also known at Tatlong Bayani class)
Type: Patrol Corvette
Displacement: 763 tons full load
Length: 205.4 ft (62.6 m)
Beam: 32.8 ft (10.0 m)
Draft: 8.9 ft (2.7 m)
Installed power: 14,188 bhp (10,580 kW)
Propulsion: [1][2]

2 x APE-Crossley SEMT-Pielstick 18 PA6 V 280 Diesel engines
2 x shafts
1 x Schottel S103 LSVEST drop-down, shrouded loiter retractable propeller, 181 shp (135 kW)
 
Speed: 25 knots (46 km/h) sustained
Range: 2,500 nmi (4,600 km) at 17 knots (31 km/h).[1]
Boats and landing
craft carried: 2 x Avon Searaider 5.4 m 30 knots (56 km/h) 10-man Semi-rigid boat aft[2]
Complement: 31
Sensors and
processing systems: Sperry Marine Naval BridgeMaster E Series Surface Search Radar
Kelvin Hughes Type 1006 Navigation Radar
Ultra Electronics Command and Control System
Radamec 1500 Electro-Optical Tracking/Fire Control System
 
Armament: 1 × 76 mm Oto Melara Compact DP gun
2 × FN 7.62 mm GP machine guns
2 × 20 mm Oerlikon guns
1 x 25 mm M242 Bushmaster on MSI mount
 
Armor: Belted Steel
The BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35) is the lead ship of the three Jacinto class of corvettes, and are considered as one of the most modern ships in the Philippine Navy. She was originally called HMS Peacock (P239) during her service with the Royal Navy. She is currently assigned with the Patrol Force of the Philippine Fleet.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Notable Deployments
2.1 Naval Exercises
3 Technical details
4 Upgrades
4.1 Gallery
5 References
6 External links
7 See also
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BRP_Emilio_Jacinto_(PS-35) :beer: :bravo: :thumbsup:

[edit] History
Launched as the first of five patrol vessels of the Peacock class, she was originally part of the Hong Kong Squadron of the Royal Navy. The ships were built by Hall Russell in the United Kingdom and were commissioned into Royal Navy service from 1983 to 1984. The class was designed specifically for patrol duties in Hong Kong waters. As well as ‘flying the flag’ and providing a constant naval presence in region, they could undertake a number of different roles including Seamanship, Navigation and Gunnery training and Search-and-Rescue duties for which they had facilities to carry divers (including a decompression chamber) and equipment to recover vessels and aircraft. They also worked with the Marine Department of the Hong Kong Police and with Customs & Excise in order to prevent the constant flow of illegal immigrants, narcotics and electronic equipment into the Colony.[3]

Out of the five ships in its class, three of them, HMS Peacock (P239), HMS Plover (P240), and HMS Starling (P241), were left in Hong Kong until 1997. They were sold to the Philippines as a sign of goodwill for US$ 20 Million, and were officially turned over to the Philippine Navy on 1 August 1997 when Hong Kong was ceded back to China.[2]


[edit] Notable Deployments

[edit] Naval Exercises
The Emilio Jacinto was part of the Philippine Navy contingent to join CARAT 2004, together with her sistership BRP Artemio Ricarte. This was followed immediately with a separate exercise with 2 British Royal Navy ships, namely HMS Exeter (D89) and RFA Grey Rover (A269).[4]

The Emilio Jacinto was again part of the Philippine Navy contingent to join CARAT 2005, together with BRP Rizal (PS-74), BRP Bacolod City (LC-550), BRP Hilario Ruiz (PG-378), and BRP Timoteo Figoracion (PG-389).[5]

Also in 2005, Emilio Jacinto joined her Malaysian counterparts for MALPHI LAUT 8/2005.[6]


[edit] Technical details
The ships under this class are characterized by a low freeboard, an Oto-Melara 76 mm gun turret located forward, large funnel amidships and a crane and rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) aft.

The Oto Melara 76 mm Compact DP, the ships' primary weapon, has a range of up to 10 nautical miles (20 km) and can be used against ships, aircraft or off and on-shore ground targets. It is remotely controlled from within the Combat Information Center by the gunnery officer and has no crew within the gun itself. The gun can fire 80 rounds in 60 seconds without reloading its magazine. The ship has load capacity for up to 450 rounds.

Its secondary weapon located at the stern, a MSI Defense System mount for a M242 Bushmaster 25 mm cannon, is integrated with the 76 mm primary weapon via an Ultra Electronics Command and Control System and a Radamec 1500 Electro-Optical Tracking/Fire Control System. This new system was installed as part of Phase 1 of the Philippine Navy JCPV upgrade program.

In addition to the abovementioned guns, these ships also carry two FN 7.62 mm general purpose machine guns at the bridgewings, and two Oerlikon 20 mm cannons at the midships.

The ships are powered by two APE-Crossley SEMT-Pielstick diesels (14,188 bhp combined) driving two three-bladed propellers. It has a drop down loiter engine with a shrouded prop of 181 bhp (135 kW) used to keep station and save fuel. The main engines can propel the 664 ton (712 tons full load) ship at over 28 knots (52 km/h), with a sustained speed of 25 knots (46 km/h). Its range is 2,500 nautical miles (4,630 km) at 17 knots (31 km/h).[1]

These corvettes were specifically designed for Asian service, having air-conditioned crew spaces and have been designed to stay at sea during typhoons and other strong weather anomalies common to Asian seas. The ships were modified soon after entering Royal Navy service with deeper bilge keels to alleviate a propensity to roll during moderate and heavy seas.[7]


[edit] Upgrades
Aside from the new M242 Bushmaster 25 mm cannon and upgrade of its Command and Control & Fire Control Systems as part of the ship's Phase 1 upgrade completed on December 2006, the Philippine Navy also installed a new Raytheon Gyro Compass, Sperry Marine Naval BridgeMaster E Surface Search Radar, GPS, Anemometer, and EM logs. These were integrated with the ship's existing systems. The Phase 1 upgrade was completed last 2005.[8]

The Phase 2 is the Marine Engineering Upgrade Program, which includes the repair and remediation of the hull, overhaul and improvement of the Main Propulsion including control and monitoring systems, electrical plant, auxiliary systems, outfitting and hull furnishings and training the navy crew in the operation and maintenance of the new plant.[7]

Phase 3, which is still under bidding, is a Service Life Extension Program (SLEP).[8]

There are plans to add anti-ship missiles to the ships, but due to top-weight problems, it would have to be a lightweight system such as Sea Skua, although no missiles have been ordered to date.[2]


[edit] Gallery
Representing the Philippine Navy together with BRP Rizal at a CARAT exercise with the US Navy
 

40niner_com

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3887
  • Obsolete weapons do not deter.
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2010, 06:57:31 AM »
14 april 2007 alongside PS-35

... on of the few photos of BRP Emilio Jacinto.  Thanks to the new member rednose.
Obsolete weapons do not deter. You do not base a defence policy on someone else's good intentions.
- Apr 7, 1989 [Baroness Margaret Thatcher, UK PM (1979-90)]

Manokski

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2596
    • http://www.HueyBravo.net
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2010, 07:37:17 PM »
Why is PS35 missing both it's anchors?  Are they being painted or is PS 35 being cannibalized?
Manokskis Orbat
http://www.HueyBravo.net
Huey Bravo

"The nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools" - Thucydides

"When you go home, tell them for us and say, For your tomorrow we gave our today" Flags of our Fathers. James Bradley

Adroth

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29592
  • Logo from: www.proudlypinoy.org
    • http://www.adroth.ph
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2010, 07:54:27 PM »
Why is PS35 missing both it's anchors?  Are they being painted or is PS 35 being cannibalized?

Scary though given PS-35 protracted absence.  :shock:

===== ~~~ =====

Then again, could this also provide a clue as to why its been missing all this time?

From: PhilGEPS

Reference Number     1056534
Procuring Entity     PHILIPPINE NAVY
Title     Repair of Thirty Six (36) Ea Cylinder Head Model Pielstick 18V PA6-V280 under Upgrade Program Requirements (Phase II) of JCPV
Area of Delivery     Cavite
Both PS-36 and PS-37 have been seen in seen in action, so that bid could be for the lead ship of the class

Don't get mad at China. GET EVEN. Join the movement to defy a Chinese "order".


jetmech

  • MBAC 21
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1936
  • Go Ugly Early!
Safety Question
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2010, 09:30:44 PM »
    Though the pictures were from the past and nothing happened, was that a break on safety rules with regards using a drydock with a ship on blocks on it, used as a pier by another vessel? Have been on 2 drydock maintenance but the drydocks were built as part of the shipyard, not floating.
I slept & dreamt that life was happiness.
I awoke & saw that life was service.
I served & found that in service, happiness is found.
                                              Tagore (1861-1941)

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing." - Edmund Burke

"You have to land here, son. This is where the food is."  Approach Magazine (LSO edition)

Manokski

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2596
    • http://www.HueyBravo.net
Re: Safety Question
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2010, 01:37:09 PM »
    Though the pictures were from the past and nothing happened, was that a break on safety rules with regards using a drydock with a ship on blocks on it, used as a pier by another vessel? Have been on 2 drydock maintenance but the drydocks were built as part of the shipyard, not floating.
Lol, our safety standards are different.  Remember the loss of one PKM on delivery!?
Manokskis Orbat
http://www.HueyBravo.net
Huey Bravo

"The nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools" - Thucydides

"When you go home, tell them for us and say, For your tomorrow we gave our today" Flags of our Fathers. James Bradley

Adroth

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29592
  • Logo from: www.proudlypinoy.org
    • http://www.adroth.ph
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2010, 04:00:09 PM »
The following bid, dated 2007, mentioned that the PS-35 had engine issues.

From: Digimart

Country:   Philippines 
City/Locality:    Unknown 
Notice/Contract Number:    phl:507081 
Publication Date:   Nov 18, 2007 
Deadline:   Dec 5, 2007 
Buyer:   PHILIPPINE NAVY

Lot1 Replacement of three (3) units Condenser of ACU bank #2 AT-25 Php 894,926.25
Lot 2 Electrical and other related repairs AT-25 Php 2,525,396.91
Lot 3 Repair of VIP spaces of AT-25 Php 1,300,000.00
Lot 4 Re-insulation of chilled water piping system AT-25 Php 2,580,000.00
Lot 5 Repair of Turbocharger of Port Main Engine of PS-35 Php 2,062,000.00
Lot 6 Structural Repair of AF-72 Php 2,411,436.00
Lot 7 Machinery Repair of AF-72 Php 959,564.40
Lot 8 Structural repair of PG116 Php 1,592,200.00
Lot 9 Structural and other related repair of PG140 Php 3,459,421.00
Lot 10 Bottomhull Replating of PG111 Php 1,088,000.00

Approved budget: PHP 18,872,944.56
Delivery period: 60 Day/s
Original notice: http://www.philgeps.net/GEPS/Tender/PrintableBidNoticeAbstractUI.aspx?menuIndex=3&refid=507081
Don't get mad at China. GET EVEN. Join the movement to defy a Chinese "order".


rednose

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 66
  • here, have 62 grains!
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2010, 08:21:59 AM »
this pic was taken today, 08 April, 2010



 :thumbsup:

Life is pleasant, Death is peaceful......
Its the transition thats a B!tch.

rednose

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 66
  • here, have 62 grains!
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2010, 08:40:35 AM »
here are some more pics of PS-35 hope you guys like it... :D






a closer look...
Life is pleasant, Death is peaceful......
Its the transition thats a B!tch.

Adroth

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29592
  • Logo from: www.proudlypinoy.org
    • http://www.adroth.ph
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2010, 09:24:18 AM »
Thanks for sharing Rednose.  :beer:

It now sports the low-viz number found on other PN boats.
Don't get mad at China. GET EVEN. Join the movement to defy a Chinese "order".


rednose

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 66
  • here, have 62 grains!
Re: BRP Emilio Jacinto (PS-35)
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2010, 10:21:19 AM »
oh thats why...thought it was the paint fading.. :eyes:

anyways, will upload a few more pics later...
Life is pleasant, Death is peaceful......
Its the transition thats a B!tch.